Holy Places In India - Jwalaji Temple

Jwalaji Temple is also known as Jwalamukhi or Jwala Devi. Jwalaji Temple is located 30 km south of Kangra Valley in Himachal Pradesh and 56 km from Dharamshala. Jwalaji Temple is dedicated to the Hindu goddess Jwalamukhi. In the valleys of Kangra, nine eternal flames of the Jwala Devi temple burn, attracting Hindu pilgrims from all over India. She is also known as the fiery goddess, due to her abode in the nine eternal flames of the temple. It is such a wonderful temple that has no idol of God. It is believed that the goddess lives in the sacred flames of the temple, which miraculously burns day and night without fuel from outside.


Science believes that some natural jets of combustible gas from the fungi of rocks cause a fire to burn. However, devotees still have great faith in the Goddess residing in these flames. Aarti performed in this temple is the main attraction. Rabri Prasad is usually offered to the Goddess. Jwala Devi Temple has been an important Hindu pilgrimage site for thousands of years and devotees will keep coming here in search of peace and bliss as long as the flame continues to burn. So let us travel you through this article today of Jwaladevi.


Jwalamukhi Temple is the famous temple of Jwalamukhi Devi. A great devotee of Goddess Durga, King Bhoomi Chand Katoch of Kangra dreamed of a holy place and the king sent people to explore the site. When that place was discovered, the king built a temple at that place. Which we know as the Jwalamukhi Temple.


According to legend, the Jwala Devi temple is at the spot where the blaring tongue of Goddess Sati fell when she sacrificed herself. The temple was built by Raja Bhoomi Chand Katoch to ensure the holy site. The Pandavas are also said to have helped the king in building the temple. However, the temple was actually completed in the 19th century.


During the Mughal period, Akbar tried to extinguish the fire several times, but he kept burning in all his divine glory. It is said that when a humble Akbar went to pay his homage amidst the flames and offered a gold "chhatra" or parasol to the goddess, the gold turned into an unknown metal which was a sign that the goddess had declined his offering have make. Let us tell you that this temple is one of the 51 Shaktipeeths and holds immense religious significance for Hindus.


The story behind the Jwala Devi temple is that the holy goddess manifested herself in the form of blue law and it is the miracle of the goddess that this law does not extinguish even when it comes in contact with water. This temple is located in the sanctum sanctorum. The temple is one of the 51 Shaktipeeths and Hindu devotees believe that the pilgrimage to Jwala Devi Temple puts an end to all their sufferings. It is believed that the tongue of Goddess Sati fell on this spot when she sacrificed herself. Later Raja Bhoomi Chand Katoch built this magnificent temple and nine flames. Jwala Devi represents nine forms of Durga - Mahakali, Annapurna, Chandi, Hinglaj, Vindhya Vasini, Mahalakshmi, Saraswati, Ambika and Anjani Devi.


There is also a mythological story behind this temple. The story goes that, several thousand years ago, a shepherd found that one of his cows had no milk left. One day he chased the cow and saw a little girl there, who drank all the cow's milk. He reported this to Raja Bhoomi Chand, who sent his soldiers to the forest to locate the sacred place, where Ma Sati's tongue fell as he believed that the little girl somehow represented the goddess. After a few years, flames were found in the mountain and the king built a temple around it. It is also imagined that the Pandavas visited this temple and renovated it. The folk song "Panjan Panjavan Pandavan Tera Bhavan Banya" bears testimony to this belief.


The sacred light of the Goddess can be seen in Jwala ji temple in nine different ways. It is said that Navadurga 14 is the author of Bhuvan, whose servants are Satva, Rajas and Tamas.The main flame burning in front of the door in the silver corridor is the form of Mahakali. This Jyoti is the Brahmo Jyoti and the power of devotion and liberation. In front of the main Jyoti is the flame of Mahamaya Annapurna which gives a large amount to the devotees. On the other side is the flame of Goddess Chandi, the destroyer of enemies. Destroy all our suffering. Jwala is of Hinglaja Bhavani. The fifth Jyot is Vidavashani to relieve all sorrows. Jyoti of Mahalakshmi, the best Jyoti of wealth and prosperity is located in Jyoti Kund. The best goddess of knowledge, Goddess Saraswati is also present in Kund. Goddess Ambika, the biggest goddess of children, can also be seen here. Goddess Anjana, who gives all happiness and longevity, is present in this kund.


This is the place where the Goddess rests. In the center of the main hall is a bed made of marble which is decorated with silver. After offering aarti to Goddess at 10:00 pm, clothes and cosmetics are kept in the room with water. Statues of Mahadevi, Mahakali, Mahasaraswati and Mahalakshmi are built outside the room. The manuscript of Guru Granth Sahib given by Guru Govind Singh is also safe in the room.


This is the place where the Goddess rests. In the center of the main hall is a bed made of marble which is decorated with silver. After offering aarti to Goddess at 10:00 pm, clothes and cosmetics are kept in the room with water. Statues of Mahadevi, Mahakali, Mahasaraswati and Mahalakshmi are built outside the room. The manuscript of Guru Granth Sahib given by Guru Govind Singh is also safe in the room.


Devotees offer Rabri, Misri, Chunri, milk, flowers and fruits to the Goddess as a token of their devotion. If you are going to Jwalaji's religious darshan, then you must know the time of opening of the temple and the darshan that happens here because the time of opening and closing of the temple is changed according to the season. In the summer, where the temple opens from 5 am to 10 pm, in winter, it opens from 6 am to 9 pm. Apart from the sanctum sanctorum, the complex has many small temples including Gorakh Dibbi and Chaturbhuj Temple, which can be a good experience to visit.

TOURIST PLACES IN KANGRA VALLEY   


AMBAKESHWAR MAHADEV 
Ambakeshwar Mahadev Dham is a Hindu temple dedicated to Lord Shiva. It is believed that Lord Shiva made the place where Sati Mata's tongue fell. Explain that Sati Mata is called Amba ji and Lord Shiva is called Mahadev Ishwar, after combining the names of these two, this temple was named Ambakeshwar Mahadev Dham.    

OLD SHIVALAY TEMPLE
The red shivalaytemple here. It is said that the Shiva lingam of Lord Shiva was brought to the temple from Nepal and was established here.

RAGHUNATHJI TEMPLE
Raghunathji's temple was built by the Pandavas. The Ashtadhatu idol of Lord Rama, Sita and Lakshmana is installed here. A part of the temple was bowed down after the 1905 earthquake in Kangra, hence it is also known as the Teeda temple.

MAA TARINI TEMPLE
To reach the temple of Maa Tarini, situated at some height to the east of Jwalamukhi Temple, one has to climb 50 stairs. The statue of Navagraha installed in this temple is the center of attraction.

BHAIRAV BABA TEMPLE
This temple is dedicated to Bhairav Baba. Devotees who come to visit the Jwala Devi temple definitely offer meat and liquor to Baba at the Bhairav Baba temple.

ASHTABHUJA TEMPLE
Ashtabhuja Temple is located 1 km east of Jwalaji, where the stone octagonal statue of mother is installed.

CHAUMUKH TEMPLE 
The Chaumukh temple is located in the village of Nadaun, dedicated to Lord Shiva, a short distance from Jwalamukhi. An idol of Lord Shiva with four faces is installed here.

BAGHMUKHI MATA TEMPLE
The temple of Baghmukhi Mata on the way from Kangra to Jwaladevi is the center of faith among the devotees. Here, special Bagmukhi Puja is organized by the tantrikas and pundits to win court case or to solve any problem related to life. Bagalamukhi Mata is also known as Pitambari Mata.


HOW TO REACH

BY AIR
How to reach Jwala Devi Temple by Air: Kangra does not have airport service. Gaggal Airport is the nearest airport at a distance of about 14 km from Kangra Valley. You can take a flight from Delhi to Dharamshala and then book a cab. You can hire a cab or bus for commuting. Chandigarh Airport is about 200 km away. Shimla and Delhi are located 212 km and 473 km respectively.


BY TRAIN 
How to reach Jwala Devi Temple by Rail: There are no direct trains to Kangra. Amritsar Shatabdi Express runs from New Delhi to Jalandhar. You can take cab from Jalandhar and reach the valley. The nearest broad gauge railhead is Pathankot. It is located at a distance of 123 km. The nearest narrow gauge railhead is Jwalaji Road, Ranital, it is located at a distance of 20 km from the temple. Taxis and buses are easily available from here.


BY ROAD
How to reach Jwala Devi Temple by Road: Direct buses from New Delhi to Kangra facilitate travel. It takes about 13 hours and the fare is around 900 rupees. You can reach the Jwalamukhi bus stand to reach the temple. The temple is well connected by road. State transport buses from cities of Punjab and Haryana often ply to Kangra. Taxis are also available.

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